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Medical Education OnlineResource Section (Curricula)

This section contains curricula and teaching resources.


The Case of Bessie Buick

Bessie Buick is a Problem Based Learning (PBL) case based on a case from Northeastern Ohio Universities and adapted by Chip Celestino, M.D at Bowman Gray School of Medicine. Bessie is an elderly Buick Skylark that is "running rough". It is a useful case for introducing the concepts of PBL and for training PBL tutors. The subject matter has the advantage of taking prospective tutors out of their area of medical expertise while making use of the obvious parallels with clinical reasoning and clinical practice.

Format: Single PDF file.


Objectives and Implementation Plan for a Managed Care Curriculum

To provide primary care residents with the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to work effectively in today’s managed care (MC) world, a curriculum was developed for a one-month rotation to a group model HMO and a complementing lecture series. The objectives outlined in Table 1. are meant to yield to a basic understanding of MC principles. The focus is on learning about the health care system rather than on adding an extra ambulatory patient care rotation. The eighteen core goals are kept sufficiently generic to permit an application to multiple specialties.

Authors:

Elizabeth Krajic Kachur, PhD; Karen S. Edwards, MD. MPH; Eliot Moshman, MD; Barney D. Newman, MD; Martin Klein, MPH; Martha S. Grayson, MD

Format: Single PDF file.


ORINTA: A Small Software Program to Learn Risk Ratio and Odds Ratio in an Elementary Course of Epidemiology

ORINTA is a small software program that runs under Microsoft Windows and can be used to learn risk ratio (RR) and odds ratio (OR) in an elementary course of epidemiology. Students can explore in an interactive way (or guided by the teacher) several situations in the common contingency table of epidemiological prospective research. They can experiment by themselves 1) The exposure OR in cases versus controls equals the disease OR for exposed versus unexposed 2) How OR approximates the RR in prospective studies when the disease is rare 3) The asymmetry of the confidence intervals for OR and RR and 4) The effect of the sample size on the p-value of the chi-square statistic and on confidence intervals.

Authors:

Santos JL (1), Pérez-Bravo F (1), Carrasco E (2), Albala C (1).

(1)- Department of Nutritional Epidemiology. Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile. Santiago, Chile.

(2)- Department of Medicine. Diabetes Section. San Juan de Dios Hospital. Faculty of Medicine. University of Chile. Santiago, Chile.

A manuscript discussing ORINTA is also available. ORINTA has been tested and found to run correctly under both Windows 3.1x and Windows 95.

Installation

The files necessary to install ORINTA are archived in "ZIP" format. Unpack the archive into a temporary subdirectory using PKUNZIP or other software capable of processing this file format. Execute "setup.exe" from this directory using the "Run" command from the Windows "File" menu or Windows 95 "Start" button to install the software. Once installed, this temporary directory can be removed.

NOTICE: The ORINTA archive is approximately 3 megabytes in size and depending on your internet connection, may take an extended period of time to download.

Press here to download ORINTA.


An interactive lecture about the logistic function as a tool for assessing risk

This software program can be used as a tutorial showing the basics of the logistic function and its use in epidemiologic research as a tool for assessing risk. The first three screens are like pages of a book and they explain how logistic function works. The fourth screen is a program that allows the calculation of the 8-years risk of cardiovascular disease for a specific risk factor profile provided by the user or student. The computation of the risk involves the published logistic equations estimated from the Framingham cohort. This software program has been written using Visual Basic 4.0 and it has been thought only for educational purposes.

Authors:

Santos JL, Albala C, Vio F.

Department of Nutritional Epidemiology. Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA). University of Chile. Santiago. Chile.

This program has been tested and found to run correctly under both Windows 3.1x and Windows 95.

Installation

The files necessary to install this program are archived in "ZIP" format. Unpack the archive into a temporary subdirectory using PKUNZIP or other software capable of processing this file format. Execute "setup.exe" from this directory using the "Run" command from the Windows "File" menu or Windows 95 "Start" button to install the software. Once installed, this temporary directory can be removed.

NOTICE: The "zip" archive is approximately 3 megabytes in size and depending on your internet connection, may take an extended period of time to download.

Press here to download this program.


Measurement of Risk in Epidemiology

This interactive minicourse is devoted to the analysis of the different measures of the frequency of the disease. It can be considered as an extended and revised version of some programs about epidemiology previously published in the resource section of Medical Education Online (1996;1:R5 and 1997;2:R1). Among several topics, we review the concepts of cumulative incidence, incidence rate and the relationship between both parameters. This software also explain the meaning of the logistic function as a risk function and the use of comparative measures of risk. This software program has been written using Visual Basic 4.0 and it has been thought only for educational purposes.

Authors: Santos JL, Vio F, Albala C.

Department of Nutritional Epidemiology. Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA). University of Chile. Santiago. Chile.

This program has been tested and found to run correctly under both Windows 3.1x and Windows 95.

Installation

The files necessary to install this program are archived in "ZIP" format. Unpack the archive into a temporary subdirectory using PKUNZIP or other software capable of processing this file format. Execute "setup.exe" from this directory using the "Run" command from the Windows "File" menu or Windows 95 "Start" button to install the software. Once installed, this temporary directory can be removed.

NOTICE: The "zip" archive is approximately 3 megabytes in size and depending on your internet connection, may take an extended period of time to download.

Press here to download this program.


Presentations, You don't have to be a magician

by Glennda M. Rassin

A slide show in PowerPoint 7.0 format for a presentation on how to create a presentation. The material is contained in a self-extracting archive. NOTE: The archive is approximately 1.1 megabytes in size and may take an extended period to download. Download the file and double-click on it. Follow the directions for extracting the slide show. You will need Microsoft PowerPoint 7.0 or higher to access the material.

An HTML version of the slide show is available online. Press here to preview the slide show.

The following reference is cited in the slide show:

  • Neal Whitman, Creative Medical Teaching, 1990.

Many of the ideas presented in the slide show were formulated from reading Presentation Magazine, 1996-1997, Lakewood Publications, Minneapolis, MN.

Download  "Presentations, You don't have to be a magician"


Employing Self-Directed Computer and Printed Resources to Reform a Medical School Epidemiology and Biostatistics Curriculum

West Virginia University School of Medicine

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Adam Cohen, medical student (3rd year) and Alan Ducatman, MD, MS

Abstract

This project identified self-directed learning resources, evaluated their utility, and suggested implementation strategies that can revise significant parts of a first-year medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics course. Computer resources and printed materials were researched for their usefulness in redesigning the curriculum, incorporating self-directed learning, and employing the use of computers. Some classroom contact can be replaced with or complemented by these new, self-directed materials. This can allow students to make more efficient use of their study time. However, no present product or combination of products was found to be appropriate for the majority of medical school needs. We expect that newer products will change this predicament in the near future.

Press here for a complete copy of the report.


Medical Informatics for Faculty Development

The purpose of this project is to introduce physicians and other health professionals and learners 1) to the many uses of the Internet and 2) to computer skills that will support the academic side of medicine and medical education.  All modules for electronic mail, newsgroups and the web are based upon versions of the Netscape tool package. Modules that address academic medicine computer skills are based upon common computer productivity tools such as Microsoft Word.

The information presented here provides a solid base of competency for the user.  Each module provides a tutorial for a single basic or advanced skill.

The materials are available at:

http://www.msu.edu/user/inetproj/homepage5.html

We would be delighted to hear from anyone who has used these tutorials, or if anyone has encountered any problems attempting to download the material. Please feel free to contact the project director Christopher Reznich at reznich@msu.edu

This project was funded ty the Bureau for Health Professions Professions Purchase order #97-0462 (P) BHPr, Health Resources and Services Administration. Their support was very greatly appreciated.

Christopher B. Reznich, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Office of Medical Education Research and Development
College of Human Medicine
Michigan State University

(517) 353-9656
reznich@msu.edu


Computer Assisted Clinical Cases

Three computer assisted infectious disease cases have been made available by Neal R. Chamberlain, Ph.D., Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine. The cases are designed to help medical students develop  problem solving skills. The cases include a history, physical, laboratory, diagnosis, and treatment sections. The cases are freely available and Dr. Chamberlain only asked that proper attributions be given to the case writer(s). 

Paul Potter

Sally Kleinfelder

Helen Sparks

Dr. Chamberlain may be contacted at NChamberlain@kcom.edu 


Inside the Leader's Office

"Inside the Leader's Office" was created in 2001 by Maurice Hitchcock, Ed D. as a new approach to teach educational leadership skills. Successful medical educational leaders are interviewed in front of our fellowship class. Video Clips from these interviews are presented here to extend the lessons of leadership to others. We hope to create a growing
database for research of leadership issues using the stories of successful leaders.

http://mededonline.hsc.usc.edu/ilo.html


The Center for Palliative Care Education

Resources - The Center for Palliative Care Education has developed a compendium of resources on HIV/AIDS palliative care topics. This resource list is divided into topics that correspond with the training modules being developed by the project. It can be used by clinicians to increase knowledge and skills, and by health educators to aid in the development of trainings and to give as handouts to trainees. This resource list will be updated periodically by project staff.

The resource list was developed by project staff from a primary search of HIV/AIDS palliative care topics, via PubMed and PsychInfo databases, as well as a search of the World Wide Web. The project directors and staff also contributed what they considered to be seminal works in each of the topic areas.

http://depts.washington.edu/pallcare/resources/index.shtml

Training Curriculum - The goal of this curriculum is to improve the quality of care that patients with HIV/AIDS receive at the end of life. The curriculum is designed to provide the materials which medical educators need to deliver effective training sessions on a number of palliative care topics.

The curriculum is divided into modules, with supporting educational materials provided for each topic. Each module consists of interactive lectures in the form of powerpoint presentations, slide notes, skills building and experiential exercises, learning objectives, sample agendas, evaluation forms, suggested handouts, and resource lists.

This curriculum was developed by palliative care clinicians and medical educators. It was then piloted in trainings in the Pacific Northwest and modified based on feedback from those pilot trainings.

http://depts.washington.edu/pallcare/training/index.shtml


SP Bibiliography

by Karen Szauter, MD

Since the first paper written about the "programmed patient" in the mid-1960's nearly 1000 papers have been published that deal with teaching or assessment using standardized patients. This bibliography lists many of these papers. The articles have been sorted into six sections by themes.

Papers of historical interest, overviews of SP use, or discuss general information about assessment that include references to SPs

Articles that deal with project or program evaluation where the SP is used to measure change, or SP measures are used to assess program or curriculum outcomes.

SPs used in teaching exercises

Objective Structured Clinical Examinations: including the development and logistics of exams and unique approaches to the application of OSCEs

Measurement tools associated with SP use. Checklists and global scoring techniques and discussions of the psychometric properties of SP assessments

Articles that discuss the influence of being an SP on the SP and articles that deal with special populations of patients (pediatric, adolescent etc)

http://oed.utmb.edu/SP/bibliography.htm


Human Morphology: A Reference Syllabus for an Integrated Course in Human Gross Anatomy, Embryology, and Histology

Lawrence E. Wineski, Ph.D and Douglas F. Paulsen, Ph.D

In 1995, in response to national trends in medical education that have placed an increasing premium on teaching time and efficiency, the Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology at the Morehouse School of Medicine initiated a significant curriculum revision. In this effort, the traditionally separate courses in human gross anatomy, embryology, and histology were merged into a single, integrated course titled, "Human Morphology." This course created a more efficient learning environment that better reflects the organization of the human body from the perspective of medical training. The format encourages students (and faculty) to continually integrate, rather than compartmentalize, information from the various subdisciplines.

In order to optimize the educational environment, the format of Human Morphology has been adjusted several times in areas such as the sequence of topics, relative proportions of each subject area (gross anatomy vs.embryology vs. histology), amount of didactic lecture time vs.laboratory and other learning experiences, participation by both clinical and basic science faculty, number of examinations, and weighting of individual examinations. At present, Human Morphology is assigned 324 contact hours in the first-year medical curriculum, at 14 semester hours of credit. Student and faculty evaluations reflect its acceptance as a very well-delivered, well-received, popular course. Student performance on the NBME Gross Anatomy & Embryology and Histology & Cell Biology subject exams matches national means, and has shown improvement since this format of course delivery was instituted.

The format for Human Morphology has evolved over the past 10 years in response to faculty, student, and administrative input. This syllabus presents the current format that has proved to be the most effective and efficient organizational scheme for delivering this course. It serves as a summary of our experiences in curricular reorganization, and as a template that other faculty may use in similar course consolidations.

The Human Morphology Course Syllabus

Lawrence E. Wineski, Ph.D.
Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology
Morehouse School of Medicine
720 Westview Drive, SW
Atlanta, GA 30310-1495

404-752-1563 (Office)
404-752-1028 (FAX)
lwineski@msm.edu

Douglas F. Paulsen, Ph.D.
Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology
Morehouse School of Medicine
720 Westview Drive, SW
Atlanta, GA 30310-1495

404-752-1559 (Office)
404-752-1028 (FAX)
dpaulsen@msm.edu


Focusing Feedback on Interpersonal Skills: A Workshop for Standardized Patients

Designed to eliminate the need for further research and laborious preparation, the Facilitator’s Guide is written to allow for easy and flexible presentation of a three-hour workshop for training standardized patients (SPs) to deliver constructive feedback.  The Guide is a fifty page document, divided into four parts.  This manual easily guides the facilitator through the workshop step-by-step using color-coded pages and large, easy-to-read type.  The standardized patients’ information is contained within this guide and is easily available for copying and distribution.

Without proper training in feedback delivery, the standardized patient-learner feedback session will not be as productive and may even be detrimental to the education of the student or resident. We have developed these materials to provide empirically-based standardized methods for training SPs to deliver effective feedback on the therapeutic communication skills demonstrated by healthcare providers.  These methods have been used by experienced, national and international, standardized patient educators since 1996.  Empirical, as well as anecdotal, evidence has been gathered to support the effectiveness of the instruction. 

The materials were originally developed in 1996 by three professionals from medical, nursing & allied health education, using the Dick & Carey Model (1990) of instructional design. The widespread use and on-going feedback from standardized patient educators led to revisions in 1998 and 2005.

We are very interested in receiving your feedback on the use of these materials. Please fill out the evaluation form in Part IV of the Guide and return it to the address below so that we may improve upon the design and add to the instruction. Alternatively, you may complete an on-line evaluation form located at the following web address: http://intercom.virginia.edu/SurveySuite/Surveys/FeedbackWorkshop

Authors:
Lisa Doyle Howley, PhD
Dianne F. Simons, PhD, OTR
James A. Murray, MSN, RN

Contact Information:
Lisa Doyle Howley, PhD
Consultant: Educational Evaluation & Research
Affiliated Professor, UNCC
19204 Double Eagle Drive
Cornelius, North Carolina 28031
(704) 236-6276 voice
(704) 894-9948 fax
ldhowley@bellsouth.net

Reference: Dick, W. & Cary, L. (1990). The Systematic Design of Instruction, Third Edition, Harper Collins.


Medical Decision Making for Common Disease Presentations
Mitra Ahmad Soltani

Introduction
HTN
S3/S4 Gallop
Arrhythmia
CAD
Trauma
Antibiotic Therapy
Altered Mental Status
Respiratory Aid

Gestational Age Calculation
Avicenna’s Explanation of IBS; Definition and Management
Cervical Trauma
Uncertain Date

OB/GYN Orders
OB/GYN Exam Questions
Biostatistics in Obstetrics
Study Guide 1
Study Guide 2
Study Guide 3
Study Guide 4
Study Guide 5
Acknowledgement

Obstetrics & Gynecology- Specific PDA: A Resident Gadget


Medical Computing Review (MCR) publishes medical computing articles and software reviews for practicing physicians and other healthcare practitioners at all levels of computer competency. Founded in 1991 as an pendent subscription-based newsletter, this year MCR is now available online as an open access publication. MCR is owned by MedicalComputing.org, a nonprofit organization.

Common Urology Complaints

The function of medical educators should be to guide both the medical providers and the medical students as they confront a plethora of multiple, often conflicting, ideas and help them hone their skills of communication with their patients. They must always keep in mind that the cure must not be worse than the disease.  The informational material is herein presented in a practical, informative, and entertaining manner, using illustrations from my own personal experiences to emphasize the points of discussion.  This should enhance the medical providers' and medical students' learning experiences and help them develop healthier and more humane doctor-patient relationships. 

You can assess this resource at: http://www.summarsh3.blogspot.com/


Strategies for Facilitating the Participation of Asian (and other) Students in Problem-Based Learning

Short title: Facilitating student participation in PBL

Louisa Remedios, (PhD., MAppl.Sc)
David Clarke, (PhD., MSc)
Lesleyanne Hawthorne (PhD., MArts)
School of Physiotherapy
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences
The University of Melbourne

Abstract

Problem-based learning (PBL) is fundamentally dialogic and collaborative in nature and requires the participation of all group members to the development of group knowledge. There is evidence that Asian students and some local students limit their verbal participation during PBL tutorials, effectively functioning as ‘silent participants’. The tutor’s role includes scaffolding all student participation without compromising individual and group learning. The following strategies designed to achieve this aim are based on research findings of the social, cultural and linguistic constraints experienced by Asian students in an Australian tertiary context.

A Whole System Approach to Problem-Based Learning
In Dental, Medical and Veterinary Sciences
-  A Guide to Important Variables –

http://www.manchester.ac.uk/ceebl/resources/resourcepacks/pblsystemapproach_v1.pdf

This is our invitation to readers concerned with medical, dental and veterinary sciences education to contribute their suggestions for adapting the Guide for wider interprofessional, international application. Please communicate with the new Editor, Professor David Powis at Newcastle University, New South Wales David.Powis@Newcastle.edu.au

The Guide is for designers and researchers of new or revised curricula, based on PBL principles.
Problem-Based Learning sets out to enable students to be active learners by presenting them with real problems which they may have to deal with in their professional career. Students work in small groups to explore the situation which faces them. This will lead them to pose questions which they will want to research, in order to manage the problem.

A tutor will also guide them, when they share what they have learned, and encourage them in applying their new understanding towards the management of the problem - in preparation for lifelong learning. Evidence-based practice calls for evidence-based education. The evidence needs to be based on critical evaluation of the design and implementation of the curriculum.

This Guide sets out to describe thirteen important variables which identify important criteria. This hierarchy of criteria includes: requirements for successful development of defined generic, as well as profession – specific competences; recruitment, selection, induction and support of students; students’ conceptualization of their experience of problem-based learning; reactions of non-clinical academics; related work place learning; planning, conduct and organization of a curriculum for contextual, integrated, cumulative, active learning; and requisites for initiating and maintaining an innovative curriculum.

                                                                                                C.E.Engel
                                                                                             University of London, UK


Problem Based Learning: What, Where, How, Who, When, Why?

is a colorful illustrative booklet designed with simple language. It provides students and educators a brief introduction to PBL using a practical real life scenario.

Author: Fadi M. Munshi, MD, MSc


The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Center for Health Care Quality at The George Washington University have developed a short educational video and PowerPoint to explain to providers the importance of identifying and addressing racial and ethnic disparities in care.

 Numerous studies document disparities in the care delivered to minority patients—even when income, education level, insurance status and other demographic and socioeconomic factors are equal. Yet most hospitals, health systems and providers have not thoroughly assessed whether such disparities exist within their organizations.

The video examines the definition of health care disparities and academic evidence of its existence and presents tested solutions to identify and address disparities from previous RWJF-funded initiatives.

 Watch the video here: http://rwjf.org/newsroom/product.jsp?id=44448


Disclaimer

This disclaimer is not meant to sidestep the responsibility for the material we will share with you, but rather is designed to emphasize the purpose of the Resource Section, which is to provide information for your own purposes. The submissions contained in the Resource Section have been chosen for their usefulness to medical educators. The material has been provided by other medical educators for distribution through MEO's Resource Section. The information should not be considered to be completely error-free or to include all relevant information; nor should it be used as an exclusive basis for the purpose for which it is being provided. The user understands and accepts that if the Journal were to accept the risk of harm to the user from use of this material, it would not be able to make the material available because the cost to cover the risk of harms to all users would be too great. Thus, use of the information is strictly voluntary and at the user's sole risk.


 


Medical Education Online Editor@Med-Ed-Online.org